“This resource is intended to help educators understand how they might address the interplay of race and trauma and its effects on students in the classroom. After defining key terms, the guide outlines recommendations for educators and offers a list of supplemental resources. This guide is intended as a complement to two existing NCTSN resources—Position Statement on Racial Injustice and Trauma and Child Trauma Toolkit for Educators—and it should be implemented in accordance with individual school policies and procedures.”

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“A new school year provides each of us with the opportunity to do things differently, make changes and grow! Why not make this
the year to learn how to help all of your students feel safe, respected and included in your classroom and school? Here are some
important steps you can take right now to make your classroom or even your whole school a more inclusive and safer space for LGBT
students.”

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“Experiencing a traumatic event of any kind can leave you feeling unsafe or unstable. Finding ways to focus on safety and building a sense of control over aspects of life can help you feel more grounded. When we lack safety, we may feel anxious, overwhelmed, or depressed. Use this worksheet to think through how you can increase feelings of security in life.”

Source: Mental Health America

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“Trauma is an emotional response to a distressing or disturbing event that overwhelms the individual’s ability to cope. Trauma is subjective – a traumatic experience for one person may not be traumatic for another, but that does not mean it is any less real for the person who is traumatized. People of all ages experience trauma, but it has a particularly long lasting impact on children as their brains are still rapidly developing. Often, children and adolescents don’t have the necessary coping skills to manage the impact of stressful events on their own or the language to explain their feelings (or even what happened).”

Source: Mental Health America

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“When we have to have a conversation about hard topics, it’s important to plan ahead so you aren’t caught off guard which can set us back. Use the following sheet to plan through what it would be like to share your experiences with someone you want to disclose information to.”

Source: Mental Health America

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“Going back to school may come with some extra nerves this year, especially since the last two school years haven’t been normal. You’ll likely be back to full-time, in-person school again, and it may feel a little weird or scary. To have a successful school year, it’s important that you feel safe in your school and classroom.”

Source: Mental Health America

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“The start of a new school year can be an exciting yet uncertain time for the whole family. Due to the circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic, many kids are facing mental health challenges right now. If you are concerned about your child or teen’s ability to readjust to in-person school and have a good year, there are things you can do at home to set them up for success and support them during this transition. Not only is the home environment the most significant factor affecting academic achievement, family member interactions help provide social and intellectual development and improve child confidence.”

Source: Mental Health America

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“Going back to school after the summer often comes with some anxiety and stress, but this year students will likely need a lot more support, reassurance, and comforting before they’ll be able to learn. Most children are dealing with some level of trauma after the uncertainty of the past two school years – trauma can occur after anything bad happens that makes the individual feel unsafe or scared. Even families who haven’t faced the loss of loved ones, financial stress, or trouble at home have had their sense of safety and security disrupted. This has an especially strong impact on children, as their brains are still developing. You can help young people move forward despite trauma – use your classroom to create situations in which they have choices, control, and feel empowered.”

Source: Mental Health America

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“Child abuse is when someone caring for a child intentionally hurts them physically or emotionally. It can be hard to recognize this abuse – it’s natural to trust that the people who are supposed to care for you wouldn’t hurt you. But your feelings are important, and if you feel scared or unsafe at home, you might be experiencing some form of abuse.

Source: Mental Health America

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Teens: 13+ years old
Youth: 8-12 years old

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An activity for middle- and high-school students.

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Supporting Resilience in Children and Families

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A county-by-county guide of programs in Maryland.

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A companion to the Maryland Resilience poster.

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An exercise for high schoolers.

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A Strength-Based Approach to Good Mental Health

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Mental Health First Aid® Maryland is a public education national certification course designed to teach individuals, professionals, businesses, and community members the skills necessary to respond with care and genuine support to an individual experiencing a mental health or substance use concern or crisis. Mental health problems are common and, with the right help, wellness and recovery are possible. Since its inception, over 40,000 Mental Health First Aiders have been trained—creating more caring, safe, and supportive communities throughout Maryland.

If you are a non-Maryland resident seeking training, please go here.

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The Pathway for Improving the Delivery of Mental Health Services in Education

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A county-by-county guide of programs in Maryland.

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Mental Health First Aid® Maryland is a public education national certification course designed to teach individuals, professionals, businesses, and community members the skills necessary to respond with care and genuine support to an individual experiencing a mental health or substance use concern or crisis. Mental health problems are common and, with the right help, wellness and recovery are possible. Since its inception, over 40,000 Mental Health First Aiders have been trained—creating more caring, safe, and supportive communities throughout Maryland.

If you are a non-Maryland resident seeking training, please go here.

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